Swiss Sense On Lying ‘Asylum’ Vacationers!


I see Switzerland has a ‘draft law,’ by which, if passed, some 40,000 fake refugees ( “people who have had their bid for asylum rejected but cannot be deported because they may, for example, face danger in their home country”) will be banned from leaving the country.

About time!

This has been a law a long time in the making!

Swiss Tell Fakers – If You Go Home, Stay Home! 

gobackyouarenotwelcome

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Splendid Swiss decision, this, ‘to strip asylum from those travelling to their home

In fact, there are a number of fake-refugees who thoroughly deserve to face a bit of ‘danger.’

The Swiss have quite a few scumbags who would be none the worse for a firing squad.

Evil ‘Asylum’ Imam Gets ‘Non-Custodial’ 18 Months! 

The Evil Within

The Evil Within

 Deport Brutal Bigots Who Beat Up Righteous Muslims! 

Just to clarify, of course it’s good if they go. But too many go and come back!

If the fakers did go back to wherever ‘home’ might be, they’d ‘automatically lose their right to live in Switzerland…’

That makes sense.

We’ve seen a lot of lying no-goods who claim to be ‘fleeing conflict’ but suddenly opt for a nice holiday back in the old country.

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snout

Disgusting parasites!

Like Canada’s Tamils, ‘German’ Syrians Exposed -‘Fake Refugees!’ 

Those examples of dishonest dirt-bags are not even ‘failed asylum-seekers’ but mendacious migrants who got through the process –

 – clearly under false pretences, if they suddenly feel free to head home to the ‘perilous’ places they lied about.

Though it’s a sensible enough move, as far as it goes, the report strangely calls it the ‘government’s tough new stance‘ – why?

Well, partly because the report is in The Leftal, sorry The Local, whose hacks and hackettes are notoriously pro-crimmigrant.

media-bias-in-action

But also because the soppy majority on the Federal Council ‘had previously rejected a parliamentary motion calling for a blanket ban’ on such travel.

You may read all the details but let’s take note of the parliamentarians who are mentioned.

First, a good gal!

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Image result for karin keller-sutter

 Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter…has a reputation for toughness on migration issues..very welcome although surprising, since she belongs to the FDP, the ‘liberal’ party!

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Image result for gerhard pfister

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Then there’s the President of the centre-right Christian Democrats, Gerhard Pfister,who welcomed the Federal Council’s announcement.

Herr Pfister has a sharp eye, because he has spotted that too many of the sly liars often transit in a third country before travelling on to their home country as a way of getting around the current ban on trips home.

Good point – these undesirables may be nasty and parasitic but they’re also sneaky.

And of course, no show without Punch…

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green party red

…. a GREEN!

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Image result for balthasar green party swiss

Greens MP Balthasar Glättli said the ban was unnecessary and an “unjustified limit on the freedom to travel”.

These Green creeps always make one want to throw up.

Freedom?

They have been proven unworthy, their claims mendacious. They should have no right to do anything in Switzerland!

Balthasar knows who to blame, though!

He said the draft law was a nod to the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party (SVP) which has argued for years that Switzerland is too easy on asylum seekers.

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16-SVP-Stop-JA

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The SVP is a patriot party and deserves applause for its frequent calls for common-sense, notably its repeated demands that asylum seekers who ‘take holidays’ at home should be deported on their return to Switzerland.

Currently, there’s an election campaign going on in Switzerland.

We should all be rooting for the SVP.

 

 

 

 

Under the draft law, the around 40,000 holders of ‘F’ permits in Switzerland – a group made up of people who have had their bid for asylum rejected but cannot be deported because they may, for example, face danger in their home country – would not be allowed to travel overseas. People who travelled to their home country would automatically lose their right to live in Switzerland, while exceptions would only be made in cases where short-term trips home were being used to prepare for a future definitive return, according the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) website. ‘A surprise move’ The Swiss government’s tough new stance on travel for F permit holders comes as something of a surprise, according to Swiss daily NZZ. The Federal Council, as the Swiss government is known, had previously rejected a parliamentary motion calling for a blanket ban on F permit holders travelling to their home country. In its original response to the motion from 2015, the government argued travel rules for people in this group were already very strict. It also stated a blanket ban would not allow for any exceptions to be made. Currently F permit holders can travel home with special permission such as in cases of personal hardship including death or serious illness in the family. Are you an F permit holder? Want to tell your story to The Local? Contact us here. But the Federal Council, and its new Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter, who has a reputation for toughness on migration issues, have now gone a step further than even the Swiss parliament. A shift to the right? If the draft law is passed, F permit holders would only be able to travel to their home county when preparing for a definitive return. The SEM confirmed to The Local via email that the proposed law (here in German) made no provision for exceptions including the serious illness of family members as is currently the case. Critically, holders of F permits would also be banned from travelling to any other third countries. Only a very few exceptions would be made to this second rule, with the specifics of these to be drawn up in future. The parliamentarian behind the original parliamentary motion, the President of the centre-right Christian Democrats, Gerhard Pfister, welcomed the Federal Council’s announcement on Thursday. He noted that F Permit holders often transit in a third country before travelling on to their home country as a way of getting around the current ban on trips home. But Greens MP Balthasar Glättli said the ban was unnecessary and an “unjustified limit on the freedom to travel”. He said the draft law was a nod to the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party (SVP) which has argued for years that Switzerland is too easy on asylum seekers. The SVP has repeatedly stated that asylum seekers who ‘take holidays’ at home should be deported on their return to Switzerland. The law has now gone out for consultation before final approval from the parliament. F permit holders in difficult position Holders of F permits in Switzerland in Switzerland find themselves in a difficult position. They are legally entitled to work, but their permission to stay in the country is only granted 12 months at a time. Many Swiss employers are reluctant to hire F permit holders because of their provisional nature of their residence, while their qualifications are often not recognized. There is a small silver lining though. Under the plans, F permit holders would in future be able to move to another canton if they find work or educational opportunities there. Currently, this is not the case.

Under the draft law, the around 40,000 holders of ‘F’ permits in Switzerland – a group made up of people who have had their bid for asylum rejected but cannot be deported because they may, for example, face danger in their home country – would not be allowed to travel overseas.

People who travelled to their home country would automatically lose their right to live in Switzerland, while exceptions would only be made in cases where short-term trips home were being used to prepare for a future definitive return, according the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) website.

‘A surprise move’

The Swiss government’s tough new stance on travel for F permit holders comes as something of a surprise, according to Swiss daily NZZ.

The Federal Council, as the Swiss government is known, had previously rejected a parliamentary motion calling for a blanket ban on F permit holders travelling to their home country.

In its original response to the motion from 2015, the government argued travel rules for people in this group were already very strict. It also stated a blanket ban would not allow for any exceptions to be made.

Currently F permit holders can travel home with special permission such as in cases of personal hardship including death or serious illness in the family.

Are you an F permit holder? Want to tell your story to The Local? Contact us here.

But the Federal Council, and its new Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter, who has a reputation for toughness on migration issues, have now gone a step further than even the Swiss parliament.

A shift to the right?

If the draft law is passed, F permit holders would only be able to travel to their home county when preparing for a definitive return.

The SEM confirmed to The Local via email that the proposed law (here in German) made no provision for exceptions including the serious illness of family members as is currently the case.

Critically, holders of F permits would also be banned from travelling to any other third countries. Only a very few exceptions would be made to this second rule, with the specifics of these to be drawn up in future.

The parliamentarian behind the original parliamentary motion, the President of the centre-right Christian Democrats, Gerhard Pfister, welcomed the Federal Council’s announcement on Thursday.

He noted that F Permit holders often transit in a third country before travelling on to their home country as a way of getting around the current ban on trips home.

But Greens MP Balthasar Glättli said the ban was unnecessary and an “unjustified limit on the freedom to travel”.

He said the draft law was a nod to the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party (SVP) which has argued for years that Switzerland is too easy on asylum seekers. The SVP has repeatedly stated that asylum seekers who ‘take holidays’ at home should be deported on their return to Switzerland.

The law has now gone out for consultation before final approval from the parliament.

F permit holders in difficult position

Holders of F permits in Switzerland in Switzerland find themselves in a difficult position. They are legally entitled to work, but their permission to stay in the country is only granted 12 months at a time.

Many Swiss employers are reluctant to hire F permit holders because of their provisional nature of their residence, while their qualifications are often not recognized.

There is a small silver lining though. Under the plans, F permit holders would in future be able to move to another canton if they find work or educational opportunities there. Currently, this is not the case.

Under the draft law, the around 40,000 holders of ‘F’ permits in Switzerland – a group made up of people who have had their bid for asylum rejected but cannot be deported because they may, for example, face danger in their home country – would not be allowed to travel overseas.

People who travelled to their home country would automatically lose their right to live in Switzerland, while exceptions would only be made in cases where short-term trips home were being used to prepare for a future definitive return, according the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) website.

‘A surprise move’

The Swiss government’s tough new stance on travel for F permit holders comes as something of a surprise, according to Swiss daily NZZ.

The Federal Council, as the Swiss government is known, had previously rejected a parliamentary motion calling for a blanket ban on F permit holders travelling to their home country.

In its original response to the motion from 2015, the government argued travel rules for people in this group were already very strict. It also stated a blanket ban would not allow for any exceptions to be made.

Currently F permit holders can travel home with special permission such as in cases of personal hardship including death or serious illness in the family.

Are you an F permit holder? Want to tell your story to The Local? Contact us here.

But the Federal Council, and its new Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter, who has a reputation for toughness on migration issues, have now gone a step further than even the Swiss parliament.

A shift to the right?

If the draft law is passed, F permit holders would only be able to travel to their home county when preparing for a definitive return.

The SEM confirmed to The Local via email that the proposed law (here in German) made no provision for exceptions including the serious illness of family members as is currently the case.

Critically, holders of F permits would also be banned from travelling to any other third countries. Only a very few exceptions would be made to this second rule, with the specifics of these to be drawn up in future.

The parliamentarian behind the original parliamentary motion, the President of the centre-right Christian Democrats, Gerhard Pfister, welcomed the Federal Council’s announcement on Thursday.

He noted that F Permit holders often transit in a third country before travelling on to their home country as a way of getting around the current ban on trips home.

But Greens MP Balthasar Glättli said the ban was unnecessary and an “unjustified limit on the freedom to travel”.

He said the draft law was a nod to the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party (SVP) which has argued for years that Switzerland is too easy on asylum seekers. The SVP has repeatedly stated that asylum seekers who ‘take holidays’ at home should be deported on their return to Switzerland.

The law has now gone out for consultation before final approval from the parliament.

F permit holders in difficult position

Holders of F permits in Switzerland in Switzerland find themselves in a difficult position. They are legally entitled to work, but their permission to stay in the country is only granted 12 months at a time.

Many Swiss employers are reluctant to hire F permit holders because of their provisional nature of their residence, while their qualifications are often not recognized.

There is a small silver lining though. Under the plans, F permit holders would in future be able to move to another canton if they find work or educational opportunities there. Currently, this is not the case.

People who travelled to their home country would automatically lose their right to live in Switzerland, while exceptions would only be made in cases where short-term trips home were being used to prepare for a future definitive return, according the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) website.

‘A surprise move’

The Swiss government’s tough new stance on travel for F permit holders comes as something of a surprise, according to Swiss daily NZZ.

The Federal Council, as the Swiss government is known, had previously rejected a parliamentary motion calling for a blanket ban on F permit holders travelling to their home country.

In its original response to the motion from 2015, the government argued travel rules for people in this group were already very strict. It also stated a blanket ban would not allow for any exceptions to be made.

Currently F permit holders can travel home with special permission such as in cases of personal hardship including death or serious illness in the family.

Are you an F permit holder? Want to tell your story to The Local? Contact us here.

But the Federal Council, and its new Justice Minister Karin Keller-Sutter, who has a reputation for toughness on migration issues, have now gone a step further than even the Swiss parliament.

A shift to the right?

If the draft law is passed, F permit holders would only be able to travel to their home county when preparing for a definitive return.

The SEM confirmed to The Local via email that the proposed law (here in German) made no provision for exceptions including the serious illness of family members as is currently the case.

Critically, holders of F permits would also be banned from travelling to any other third countries. Only a very few exceptions would be made to this second rule, with the specifics of these to be drawn up in future.

The parliamentarian behind the original parliamentary motion, the President of the centre-right Christian Democrats, Gerhard Pfister, welcomed the Federal Council’s announcement on Thursday.

He noted that F Permit holders often transit in a third country before travelling on to their home country as a way of getting around the current ban on trips home.

But Greens MP Balthasar Glättli said the ban was unnecessary and an “unjustified limit on the freedom to travel”.

He said the draft law was a nod to the anti-immigration Swiss People’s Party (SVP) which has argued for years that Switzerland is too easy on asylum seekers. The SVP has repeatedly stated that asylum seekers who ‘take holidays’ at home should be deported on their return to Switzerland.

The law has now gone out for consultation before final approval from the parliament.

F permit holders in difficult position

Holders of F permits in Switzerland in Switzerland find themselves in a difficult position. They are legally entitled to work, but their permission to stay in the country is only granted 12 months at a time.

Many Swiss employers are reluctant to hire F permit holders because of their provisional nature of their residence, while their qualifications are often not recognized.

There is a small silver lining though. Under the plans, F permit holders would in future be able to move to another canton if they find work or educational opportunities there. Currently, this is not the case.